Birth issues

Recently, my good friend F. Davis Morse at the Consumer Justice Group had an honor even greater than the day he passed the bar exam, his winning multimillion dollar settlements, or his Supreme Court victory: He became a father.

But what should have been the happiest day of his life was overshadowed by the hospital’s mechanized medical apparatuses in place for birthing mothers, a frightening array of unnecessary procedures and forced practices. Davis blogs about it at blogspot.com.
What’s particularly interesting for me is other people’s similar reactions whenever I talk about my or another lawyer’s blogs. They seem suspicious, like I’m having them on. Maybe it’s like how children imagine their elementary school teacher sleeps in the classroom: it’s hard for laypeople to imagine lawyers having a private life or being affected by the world outside the courtroom.

But at the day (and despite the jokes), lawyers are people, live in the same world and are subject to the same injustices and horrors as we write about here and fight against in trials.

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